Running in circles

There’s a Gaelic saying ‘Eadar da theine Bealltainn’ which means something like to be between two Beltane fires, or in order words, to be between a rock and a hard place. The springtime energey of Beltane season is behind us now but the political bonifres of the preceding weeks are still smouldering hot.

June and early July went by in a bit of a blur for me. It was hard to keep up with the capricious pace of change on Constitution Street, let alone the intractable mess of UK constitutionalism post General-Election and pre Brexit. Here are few things that seemed to be important.

The UK feels a bruised and bruising place right now. The tragedy of the Grenfell Tower fire in London shocked the country and prompted important and difficult questions about class, race and social housing. As David Lemmy MP said “It is as though we live in Dickensian times with a tale of two cities”.

I’ve never been inside the tower block at the far end of Constitution Street, Kirkgate House, and to have any understanding of our lived expereinces on the street, it’s important that I meet these neighbours too.

The General Election winners appeared as loosers, the loosers as winners and all of the political pundits were proven wrong. The Prime Minister gambled and lost her UK majority and the SNP lost a third of its seats in Scotland while the Corbyn bounce-effect for the UK Labour party exceeded all expectations and the DUP in Northern Ireland (where there is no functioning devolved government) held the balance of power in the UK to give the Conservatives their majority at Westminster. The muddied landscape of territorial politics looked more slippery and uncertain than ever before

Back on Constitution Street and with ten minutes until the close of polling stations on 8th June, I drove Tony the short distance from his ground floor flat on Cadiz Street to St Mary’s Primary School polling station on nearby Leith Links. Reporting excellent home-care from the NHS, Tony told me that he didn’t see the point in voting but that he would be quite glad to get out of the house and go ‘cruising’. After greeting his many local friends staffing the electoral registration tables within the school gym hall and with the clock striking 10pm, Tony triumphantly declared “I’m an elector!”.

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Tony after voting

I don’t know where Tony put his ‘X’ in the box but Edinburgh North and Leith constituency recorded a 71% voter turnout with the SNP’s Deidre Brock holding her seat (19,243 votes, 43% of the share) despite a close second from Labour (local councillor Gordon Munro taking 31% of the vote) and surprisingly close third from the Conservatives (27%).

Reading later about the breakdown of votes, I learnt that our constituency has the highest proportion of residents living in tenements and flats of any parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom and that the constituency also includes Bute House, the official residence of the First Minister of Scotland.

The First Minister acknowledged that talk of a second independence referendum was a contributing factor in the nationwide voter swing to unionist parties and it is now  unikely that a further referendum will take place before the 2021 Holyrood Parliamentary term, if indeed at all. This is disappointing news for independence supporters but the residual constitutional ambiguity amid a protracted Brexit negotiation may serve to further underline the need for a rethink about how the respective nations of the UK exist together and how finance is fairly distributed. Constitutional questions about the right to self-termination remain unresolved.

 

 

 

 

Leith Gala Day ‘Tory-free zone T shirts’, Yes 2014 grafitti on the Constitution Street pavement and a park bench inscription at Customs House Lane.

Another post-election harr hung low over Leith docks on the Friday morning after the election night before. Then the following day and in the final minutes of extra time, Scotland lost their lead in the football against England. Roars were followed by heavy sighs in the pubs up and down Constitution Street. We had been robbed, again. Standing in line for some consoling chips, I was cheered by meeting Adriano, owner of Perinos  Fish and Chip Shop. He asked me when he can be ‘booked in’ for his Constitution Street interview. Word has gotten around.

Perseverance, the Leith motto, is what we’re good at here. The annual Leith Gala Day on the Links to mark the start of Leith Festival was packed out with candy floss, wee dugs, reggae music, raffles and home-baking. Poor Tony was laid up at home not well enough to get out dancing to his favourite band, Messenger, much to the annoyance of Festival Chair, Mary Moriarty, who had booked the band at Tony’s insistence. With the help of Bonnie dog, I guided visitors around the Constitution Street Corn Exchange, on the Leith Late Walking Tour and I performed my Porto essay at the Glasgow CCA one evening.

 

 

 

 

Rain water poured in through the living room ceiling on my last day of salaried employment after a deluge of rain in an unseasonablly wet June. Combined with a parking ticket from Lidl, propsects felt a bit gloomy. Leaving a damp Edinburgh behind, I set off for a few days away from the street. I was fair chuffed to complete the Barrathon – a half-marathon following the circumferance of the circular-shaped isle of Barra- and then to join island friends on the north western side of Lewis at Uig bay in the Mackenzie sisters’ caravan (see At the Half-Way House at Balallan).

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the caravan at Uig, isle of Lewis

After a magical time in the dunes and on gneiss rocks watching seabirds and the moon grow fatter under a spring tide, I returned to the mainland for my first working week of the sabbatical. The taxi driver that delivered Bonnie and I back to Constitution Street from Waverley train station late on Sunday night remarked, with considerable nostalgia, that his big brother, now deceased, used to live at number 72.

Perhaps like a running race, the beginning (the first 5km or the first few weeks) can feel like the steepest. My body feels heavy and slow in these early days of the project and I am full of self-doubt. Still, I am now committed to the effort and know that I need to find my own rythmn. I am trying to find that while a Fellow at the Institute of Advanced Studies in Humanities (IASH) at Edinburgh University and, with greater ease, while in residence at my Grandma’s house each Friday. I am loading up on sugary snacks and good tunes to pace myself.

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the view from 31 Hope Park Square overlooking the Meadows

 

Things I have been reading this month:

  • The First Day, by Phil Harrison
  • His Bloody Prooject Project by Graeme McCrae Burnett
  • Bird by Bird: Instructions on Writing and Life, by Anne Lamott

It’s goodnight and goodluck from Constitution Street for now.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The View From Here

Well, it’s not been a quiet month here on Constitution Street, where all the women are strong, the men are good-looking and the children are above average….

An announcement on a further Scottish Independence Referendum, the triggering of Article 50, a surprise General Election to be held out with the fixed term of Parliament, and the closure of the Port O’ Leith bar in Leith, have all kept things interesting the past month. Only one of these constitutional changes has a certain outcome. And, this, from the same shock announcement that had grown men lining the street, in tears, at 1am, holding hands and singing passionately about home, place and identity.

It seems that in politics, as in the drinking game, timing is everything and only those with cool heads and warm hearts stay standing. We will soon have had two general elections and two referenda in the space of three years, with more votes likely in the near future. The Scottish Government was told by the UK Prime Minister that now is not the time for a choice on Scotland’s future as an independent country as it would be a distraction to Brexit negotiations. The electorate was then told that now is the time to hold a snap General Election.

March – April has also been a time for written correspondence. It’s nice to see the revival of letter-writing. The First Minister Nicola Sturgeon wrote to Prime Minister Theresa May setting out what she believes to be her mandate for a further referendum and of the need for people in Scotland to make an informed choice about their place in the UK and Europe ahead of the BREXIT settlement. The Prime Minister then wrote to the President of the European Council, triggering Article 50 and the UK’s departure from Europe. And back here in Leith, I wrote to my boss setting out my proposal for a 9-month sabbatical from the day job, beginning 1 July, to concentrate on the Constitution Streeters project. I’m delighted to have received a very positive, supportive approval for the career break from Voluntary Arts Scotland. My job will soon be advertised as a fixed term contract similar to maternity leave cover.

Nine months. Three seasons of the year. Five inches of hair growth. The full term of a human foetus. And perhaps, if I work hard and am lucky, time to develop a book.

The labour pains have been testing in these early days. A week off over Easter to read and assemble thoughts reminded me how challenging working from home can be and left me experiencing symptoms of nausea, guilt and worry about the inevitable fluctuations in creative productivity. All learning etc. But I recognise the importance, to me anyway, of a daily routine and breaking a big project down into small constituent parts. I am now actively seeking out a supervisor to help me prioritise tasks and maintain pace. And co-working space. I want the discipline of company and the quiet but reassuring hum of others in a room to keep witness to a working day. I have approached both Customs House (Scottish Historic Buildings Trust) on nearby Bernard Street and the Centre for Constitutional Change at Edinburgh University Law School about hosting a creative residency. They’re thinking about it.

My choice of timing reflects my wish to take advantage of daylight and community happenings in the summer months during the participatory research stage of the project and to minimise any potential risks to the arts charity I currently head up (funding and staff jobs are secure in this 9 month period). Office colleagues have all been very supportive about the change.

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Leith Library, Ferry Road

I’ve completed my first interview. This was with a couple who recently moved their family home and architecture practice from no.63 Constitution Street. There was no particular significance attached to starting here first. It was simply a bright sunny afternoon and it suited me to join them for a dog walk in their new leafy location to the southwest of Edinburgh. As with all the informal conversations with neighbours thus far, the interviewees expressly wanted me to know their voting pattern (I would never ask) and seemed very happy to have been asked for their particular telling of the Constitution Street story.

What other things am I learning?

  1. To say as little as possible during the interviews to give respondents space to shape their own contribution and not second-guess my views.
  2. Taking my fold-out chair to the front door steps in the morning sunshine gives a special snapshot of the street-view. Masked by big sunglasses, a book and even bigger mug of tea, I can discreetly observe and listen to fragments of passing conversation, be warmed by the lightness of familiar greetings, notice the patterns of comings and goings and can trace the faint April sun’s journey east to west– my sun-deck at the front door steps of no.68 becomes a cold shadow by the afternoon and across the road is then the place to be. I sat like this finishing the sublime ‘Lonely City’ by Olivia Lang, a book I found myself underlining entire paragraphs of. Given her subject matter, it seemed entirely appropriate to complete while alone but amidst the street surf of people washing in and out the front door to the tenement stair.
  3. Beneath everyday household clutter, the table in my spare bedroom is an attractive and functional desk space.
  4. Retaining professional and social networks during a period of solitary writing will be important. If you’re reading this and are in one of those two categories, or any other category actually, please don’t be shy at picking up the phone!

People have been generous in their reading recommendations. These are my trail markers for the navigation of a broad subject. This month I have been dipping into or revisiting:

  • The Rings of Saturn, W. G. Sebald
  • Autumn, Ali Smith
  • The Lonely City, Olivia Lang
  • Lifetimes of Commitment, Molly Andrews

A welcome confidence boost came from getting a place on a series of essay writing workshops entitled ‘Genre-Bending’, tutored by some personal literature crushes including Max Porter and Karine Polwart. Experimenting with form and spending two days experimenting with other writers feels pretty jammy.

The sabbatical is unpaid and I only have three or four months’ salary saved. But somehow I’m surprisingly relaxed about that. I am fortunate to own my flat, to have a modest income from occasional yoga-teaching and to not have any dependents aside from a dog to feed and medicate. And regards Bons/ Guru-B, we have a literary collaboration of our own in mind too. I really do think everything is going to be alright.

It’s been far from an easy few weeks but I’ve made some small steps. It turns out that being on, within and of the street is all-engaging and that anything is possible. In the weeks ahead, I will be prioritising finding a mentor and a work space in time for the July start date. 1st July is also the date of the Barrathon Half-Marathon that I have been arm-twisted into entering by my friend Christina (see Halfway House poem). I love the isle of Barra (Barra bunting) and regardless of running ability, the surge of fresh air, exercise and good company will ensure that this new phase of life begins with a top-up of endorphins.

Finally, Leith library (Ferry Road) is a place of under-recognised grandeur, free book loans and undemanding company. At first glance, it appears a bit grotty like the street outside – old flyers on the community notice board, toddlers throwing plastic toys at one another while their parents negotiate broken computers and English-language lessons- but look closer and you see the black and white vintage photographs in frames depicting our streetview of yesteryear, the suspended reading lights that resemble planets in a solar system and a steady flow of fellow citizens arriving for MSP surgeries, settling into a quiet corner to be lost in one’s own thoughts with a good book, or simply wanting a warm, safe place in which to have a doze. We lose public libraries at our peril.

Word on the street.